DH@CC

Grant materials related to the 5C Mellon Grant

DH@CC Summer Institute Meeting February 9, 2015

DH@CC Summer Institute Meeting 2-9-15

 

  • This meeting is called to refine the information we’ve been developing in past Summer Institute meetings. We will first address the structure of the seminar. We     will also discuss DH@CC resources and how those resources will be provided to participating faculty. We also want to establish what information the seminar will provide, what questions it will answer. We will provide hands-on demos in the institute, so we need to establish what those look like and which tools are focused on. There will also be a best practices session with the library.

 

  • The Summer Institute is a week long event where faculty who plan to apply for Digital Course Development grants can learn more about DH, explore possibilities, and build skills for using DH tools. Snacks and coffee will be provided, but participants will provide their own lunches.

 

  • 10 faculty members will participate in the Summer Institute. Preference will be given to faculty who are new to DH. Applications for the Summer Institute, which were already designed and implemented in our last meeting, are due on March 6th. They will be reviewed by this committee on March 9th, and we will notify faculty of our decisions     on Friday, March 13th.

 

  • Once our 10 participants are chosen, we will send them a survey to establish which break-out sessions will take place in the afternoon. They will choose 4 from a list of 11, which we developed in our last meeting.

 

  • Faculty are encouraged to come to     the Summer Institute with a project they would like to investigate. This could be the Digital Course they want to develop.

 

  • The Summer Institute will work like a clinic, or hands-on seminar.

 

  • The mornings of the Summer Institute will be lectures.

 

  • The afternoons will consist of hands-on tool and skill learning. Four experienced individuals will be paid 400 dollars to give these sessions. They will be optional     for faculty, as they may choose to do one-on-one mentoring instead.

 

  • A best practices lecture will take place after lunch. This part of the day addresses meta data, copyright, data management, privacy, and so on.

 

  • Following the day’s event, there will be a reception where faculty and facilitators can decompress and discuss the day’s findings.

 

  • 9:30 to 10am coffee and socializing

 

  • 10am to 11am: First session—The     Digital and the Disciplines

 

  • 11am to 12pm: Reading on DH

 

  • 12 to 1:30pm Lunch

 

  • 1:30 to 3pm: Breakout session

 

  • 3 to 3:30pm: Break

 

  • 3:30 to 4:30pm: Best Practices

 

  • 4:30 to 5pm: Reception

 

Summer Institute Fellows, 2015

bill_anthes@pitzer.edu                                  PIT                                           Art

ggilbert@cmc.edu                                         CMC                                        Religion

mgonzale@scrippscollege.edu                     SCR                                        IDCLA

jmhall@pomona.edu                                      POM                                        MS

vhamilton@hmc.edu                                      HMC                                        History

cjaquez@scrippscollege.edu                        SCR                                         Music

gizem.karaali@pomona.edu                          POM                                        Math

gkates@pomona.edu                                     POM                                        History

Joyce.Lu@pomona.edu                                 POM                                        Theater/Dance

harmony_orourke@pitzer.edu                        PIT                                          History

joti.rockwell@pomona.edu                             POM                                        Music

kathleen_yep@pitzer.edu                               PIT                                           IDAAS

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DH@CC Grant Winners and Summer Institute Fellows Announced

On March 9th, the DH@CC committees convened to discuss and select the 2015 DH grant recipients. The opportunities that were offered include Course Development Grants, which are intended to infuse digital pedagogy into existing courses or implement new DH courses, and The Summer Institute, a week-long educational event that will be tailored specifically to the DH interests of faculty participants.

Decision making was difficult because of the inventiveness and creativity of the applications received. In fact, the committee determined that more applications should be approved for the first year round of grants than was originally planned. Though this decision gave the selection process momentum, final decisions were still a challenge. After determining fair and appropriate criteria, however, the committee is pleased to present the chosen grant recipients and institute fellows.

Course Development Grant Winners

Eric Doehne for new course Capturing Art: Digital Preservation and Analysis in 100 Objects – Scripps – Art Conservation

Tarrah Krajnak for a redesign of Introduction to B&W Photography – Pitzer – Art

Gina Lamb for a redesign of Media for Social Change – Pitzer – Media Studies

Rachel Mayeri for a redesign of Art and Science – Harvey Mudd – Media Studies

Daniel Michon for a new course design – CMC – History

Paul Steinberg for a new course design – Harvey Mudd – Political Science

T. Kim-Trang Tran for a redesign of Women’s Work and Collective Actions – Scripps – Art

Raquel Vega-Duran for a redesign of Encounters in the Atlantic – CMC – Modern Language and Literature

Summer Institute Fellowships

Bill Anthes – Pitzer – Art

Gary Gilbert – CMC – Religious Studies

Martha Gonzales – Scripps – IDCLA

Jonathan Hall – Pomona – Media Studies

Vivien Hamilton – Harvey Mudd – History

Candida Jaquez – Scripps – Music

Gizem Karaali – Pomona – Math

Gary Kates – Pomona – History

Joyce Lu – Pomona – Theater and Dance

Harmony O’Rourke – Pitzer – History

Joti Rockwell – Pomona – Music

Kathleen Yep – Pitzer – IDAAS

Intro to DH Reading/Exploratory Group

March 4 – April 24

This group provides an overview of what DH is and how it can enhance your research and teaching. Each week we will read several articles or book chapters, explore digital projects, and get our hands dirty as we learn how to use digital tools. Our discussions will interrogate the underlying epistemologies of the practices and theories we’re investigating that week, as well as how those tools and approaches support our scholarship and pedagogy, specifically.

Objectives:

  • Understand what DH is
  • Develop interest in a specific area that enhances your own work
    • Determine the next steps to explore that area further
  • Prepare you to lead your own discovery group within your college or in your broader discipline across the 7Cs

This reading group will also prepare you to submit applications for the Mellon-funded

  • Course Development Grants
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the Claremont Colleges

This introductory reading group will be offered again in Fall 2015. Stay tuned for more details!

DH@CC 2015 Spring Symposium Presentations

DH@CC Spring Symposium Presentations

DH@CC is proud to present the following 5C speakers at the 2015 Inaugural Spring Symposium, which will be held on February 20th at the Honnold Mudd Library. Times and locations will be posted in the coming weeks.

HUMANITIES  School Field
Warren Liu SCR English
Carina Johnson PIT History/Religion
Richard McKirahan POM Classics
Laura Trombley via video PIT English
Kevin Mulroy CCL American Studies
Mark Andrejevic POM Media Studies
Jeff Groves HMC Literature
PEDAGOGY School Field
Max Benavidez CMC New Media, Communications and Higher Education
Ashley Sanders CCL Digital Scholarship
Nancy Macko SCR Art
Alex Juhasz PIT Media Studies
Vida Mia Garcia and Tom Maiorana POM/Red Cover Studios Ethnographer and Designer
Jonathan Hall POM Media Studies
Cynthia Humes CMC Religion/IT
TOOLS School Field
Eric Doehne SCR Art Conservation
AJ Strout CC Video
Warren Roberts CCL GIS
David Bachman PIT Math
Rachel Mayeri HMC MS
Dan Michon CMC Religion
Rachel Levy HMC Mathematics

DH@CC Spring Symposium Meeting January 26, 2015

Spring Symposium Meeting, January 26, 2015

  • The Spring Symposium sub-committee is meeting to determine the workshop speakers, their topics, and a working schedule for presentations at the February 20th Spring Symposium event in the library. Since many faculty members were not available for this meeting, we will hold nominations for the workshops today and send out invitations to these nominees tomorrow.

 

  • PR materials have been developed for the grant and for the Spring Symposium. The www.claremontdh.com website now features the DH@CC logo that Joel Cinnamon of CUC has designed for us. It has already been implemented on the posters designed by Kate Crocker. In the coming weeks, branded USB flash drives will be made available for further promotion of the event.

 

  • The Spring Symposium has been announced on the official DH@CC blog/website, and several of the 5Cs have agreed to announce it on their events pages and/or academic calendars. News of our guest speakers (Dr. Alan Liu on Feb 18 at Rose Hills, and Dr. Miriam Posner on Feb 20 at Honnold Mudd 9am) is spreading quickly and efficiently.

 

  • Alex envisions that the “Workshop Presentations” will be 5 minute, information presentations which highlight the use of a tool, method, or larger question for research, writing, or teaching in the Digital Humanities. We will encourage the presenters to raise questions which might facilitate discussion during the afternoon’s unconference.

 

  • Once we have a working list of faculty who will present, along with titles and abstracts for their presentations, we will upload this information to the claremontdh.com website.

 

  • Again, there are 4 themes/rubrics for the Spring Symposium. 1. DH – definitions and critical thinking. This will be presented in the morning by Dr. Miriam Posner. The other three themes/rubrics will be presented by our faculty nominees: 2. Pedagogy 3. Humanities 4. Tools.

 

  • Ashley Sanders will manage the schedule for Feb 20th’s Spring Symposium’s Workshop event. AJ will provide details as they manifest, and meet with Ashley to further discuss publishing on the DH@CC website. The finalized schedule with faculty names, titles/abstracts for presentations, and times will be provided by Ashley and AJ to Kate Crocker, who will develop a brochure and event schedule for distribution.

 

  • There is now a link at the top of the DH@CC Home Page which attendees for the Spring Symposium may use to RSVP for lunch, and provide ideas/questions that they would like to discuss during the unconference on the afternoon of Feb 20th. The link is easy to access and use.

DH@CC Digital Course Development Meeting January 26, 2015

Digital Course Development Meeting January 26, 2015

DH@CC Digital Course Development Application: http://claremontdh.com/applications/

 

  • This sub-committee is meeting to design the application for Digital Course Development funding. It is our intention to make the application available tonight. We will work from the draft we began on our December 19th meeting.

 

  • For the sake of time and accessibility, the document is being produced through Google Sheets. In the future, we may explore alternative options.

 

  • To raise awareness of the application, it will be announced at upcoming faculty/curriculum meetings, distributed to the DH@CC Advisory Committee and to the Deans of Faculty, uploaded to the blog, announced at the DH@CC Spring Symposium Keynote event as well as the larger event at the library.

 

  • The Spring Symposium committee has decided to invest in branded USB flash drives for PR. Along with information regarding DH@CC events and opportunities, a link to the application will also be made available therein.

 

  • The details are, again, for Digital Course Development funding: Faculty will receive $6,000 for development of their digital course, and up to an additional $4500 in the summer or when they teach the course for undergrad, or $5,500 for a graduate assistant. The grant has been specifically written for course development only at the 5Cs.

 

  • Deadline for faculty applications for Digital Course Development is March 6, 2015. The review process will take place by the Digital Course Development sub-committee on March 9, 2015. Applicants will be notified that week, by March 13, 2015.

 

  • Ashley Sanders has provided an excellent working definition for the Digital Humanities. “DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools…”

 

Below is the 2nd draft of the Digital Course Development Application:

 

DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools to

  • visualize and analyze data
  • share and annotate primary sources
  • discuss and publish findings
  • collaborate on research and teaching for scholars, students, and the general public.

(Ashley Sanders, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Claremont Colleges, “Defining the Digital Humanities,” Colonialism Through The Veil [blog], 2013)

 

Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges takes an expansive and inclusive approach: scholars who use digital methods in their teaching, research or publication and/or are considering the digital, as humanists, in their teaching, research or publication. Faculty with appointments in fields not traditionally understood as the Humanities are welcome to apply if they are engaging in Humanistic inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to attend the DH@CC Spring Symposium (February 18 and 20, 2015). Faculty can receive one grant for Digital Course Development, must teach the course they received funding for twice within the grant period, and give an informal presentation on their course as part of the grant’s community programming. that will be recorded and posted in Scholarship@Claremont . Faculty can apply for other DH grants: the Summer Faculty Workshop and/or the Digital Technology Studio.

 

Deadlines:     March 6, 2015

September 18, 2015

February 5, 2016

 

Application Content:

Name:

College:

Department:

Will the course be cross-listed?

Is it a new course or a redesign of an existing course?

When do you first plan to teach this course? (Faculty do not have to teach the course right away. They may choose to teach it in the future)

 

  1. Describe your proposed course. What are the overarching questions or themes of the course? 250 words max
  2. How does this course add to the Humanities curriculum and/or your departmental program offerings? 250 words max
  3. What do you hope to accomplish if you add or implement technology within this course? 250 words max
  4. Does your course require digital tools? What kind of assistance/technology do you need? Such as: IT support, library assistance, digitizing primary sources/special collections? 100 words max
  5. If you are applying for an assistant, are you requesting funding for an undergraduate ($4,500) for summer or or graduate student ($5,500) for research or for assistance when the course is taught? Do you already have someone in mind? What is their role?
  6. Additional Information (optional)

 

  • We will also include a note in the grant application for additional resource requests: If your course relies on small-scale technological resources unavailable to you, a separate application     can be made to the digital technologies committee and be purchased for the digital studio.

 

  • Collaboration between faculty members is encouraged but not required.

DH@CC Summer Institute Meeting January 26, 2015

Summer Institute Meeting January 26, 2015

Summer Institute application form: http://claremontdh.com/applications/

 

  • This sub-committee is meeting today to design a grant application for the Summer Institute and determine its shape and goals. As no faculty members were able to attend today, we will address the details for the application alone, and plan for another meeting in which we can determine the goals and details of the Institute itself.

 

  • PR materials have been developed both for the grant, and specifically for the Spring Symposium. The claremontdh.com website now features the DH@CC logo that Joel Cinnamon of CUC has designed for us. This logo can be used on all pertinent DH materials at the 5Cs. It has already been implemented on the posters designed by Kate Crocker from the Library. This is also viewable on the www.claremontdh.com website.

 

  • Faculty who wish to apply for the Summer Institute or Course Development Grants will be strongly encouraged to attend the Spring Symposium, our inaugural event which is meant to facilitate discussion regarding current projects and ongoing questions at the Claremont Colleges and ideally to introduce DH to faculty who are unfamiliar with it.

 

  • Likewise, faculty who wish to apply for Digital Course Development funding will be strongly encouraged to attend both the Spring Symposium, and the Summer Institute.

 

  • Once details are determined for the Summer Institute, this information will become available on the claremontdh.com website. We have decided to add a rotation of tabs for each event that we facilitate for the DH grant at the 5Cs. Later this week, for example, there will be a Spring Symposium tab. Once the event is over, this will become the Summer Institute tab.

 

  • Ashley Sanders has provided an excellent working definition for the Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges. “DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools…”

 

  • There is concern amongst those present at this meeting, that the questions on our application will seem daunting or overwhelming. By keeping the required responses at a maximum of 250 words, we hope to quell any concern. The information collected on the application has been polished into a succinct but necessary group of questions which will assist in the selection process.

Below is a rough draft of the application for the Summer Institute:

 

June 1-5, 2015

The DH@CC Summer Institute is a five-day opportunity for ten faculty members to be introduced to the themes, tools, and pedagogical principles and practices of the Digital Humanities. There is a $1,000 stipend for attending. We will give preference to those who are new to the field. The institute is a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion about underlying frameworks for DH, as well as hands-on learning and demonstrations in tools and methods. There will be opportunities for 1-1 mentoring and interaction with outside and local specialists. After attending the institute, you will be prepared to apply for the course development grant or launch the first stages of a digital humanities grant and/or project. Applications are due March 6, 2015.

DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools to

– visualize and analyze data

– share and annotate primary sources

– discuss and publish findings

– collaborate on research and teaching for scholars, students, and the general public.

(Ashley Sanders, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Claremont Colleges, “Defining the Digital Humanities,” Colonialism Through The Veil [blog], 2013)

 

Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges takes an expansive and inclusive approach: scholars who use digital methods in their teaching, research or publication and/or are considering the digital, as humanists, in their teaching, research or publication. Faculty with appointments in fields not traditionally understood as the Humanities are welcome to apply if they are engaging in Humanistic inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to attend the DH@CC Spring Symposium (February 18 and 20, 2015). Faculty can attend the Summer Institute once, and are encouraged to apply for a Digital Humanities Course Development grant and/or the Digital Technology Studio.

form:

  1. What do you already know about DH or digital learning? (250 words max)
  2. What do you hope to learn? (250 words max)
  3. What do you want to work on during the institute? (250 words max)
  4. Additional information (optional)

DH@CC Summer Institute Meeting December 19, 2014

Summer Institute Meeting December 19th from 3 to 4:30pm

  • This sub-committee is meeting to determine what takes place during the DH Summer Institute: two week-long institutes (one in 2015 and one in 2016) meant to facilitate DH knowledge, build skills in DH tool and technology use, and inspire DH project ideas.
  • Information and skill building lectures/presentations will be presented by four experts at $400 each. These experts will be largely in-house. That is, faculty and library staff will present. There is $4000 available for materials and tech support. The outcome of the DH Summer Institute is not a tool or program, but skill building for faculty who are new to DH. The event will also be casual and social, however.
  • We plan to hand out informational fliers about the DH Summer Institute at the upcoming DH Spring Symposium which is scheduled to take place on the evening of February 18th and all day on February 20th. We are proposing June 1-5 for the DH Summer Institute.
  • Possible DH Summer Institute formats include: One-on-one mentoring, hands-on tool use, lectures and demos, participant survey, assessment. It is very likely that we will have a seminar in the morning, followed by lunch, then a break out sessions with demos followed by hands on tool use. Because there are so many DH tools to cover, we will assign one or two tools per day.
  • Themes for the DH Summer Institute include: Defining DH, Tenure and promotion, digital publication, social media, DH projects, DH pedagogy, Critical Digital Studies, Political Applications, Real world applications.
  • Best Practices will be presented over lunch by staff from the library: i.e. Meta data, data management, copyright and intellectual property, privacy, communicating projects with the public, and digitization.
  • DH Tools could include: G.I.S./Story mapping (Warren), History (Allegra) 3D preservation (Eric/Chris), Scalar (Allegra), Wikipedia (Char and Alex), text mining (Sam), WordPress (Char), Omeka (Chris), Twitter (Allegra, Char, Sam), video (AJ), Clicker/Poll (Char, Dani, Eric), Flipped Classroom, MOOCs, and Google Glass.
  • 5C Resources include: Library, I.T. DH lab, and other labs.
  • Because the grant is organized to require faculty attendance at the Summer Institute in order to apply for digital course development, there will be a form/survey for attending the DH Summer Institute: What I know about DH or digital learning. What I want to learn. A particular course or pedagogic problem/question or module in existing course.

DH@CC Digital Course Dev Meeting December 19, 2014

Digital Course Development Meeting December 19th from 1pm to 2:30pm

 

Overall Discussion Topics:

  • Over the next 3 years, professors can apply to receive a stipend for Digital Course Development and, if desired, assistance from an undergrad or graduate student for their course. Over the course of the grant, 25 courses will be funded. Chosen faculty will teach their course twice in the 5 year period of the grant. They will be required to make a public presentation about their course and what they learned. hese presentations will be recorded and posted in Scholarship@Claremont
  • Chosen faculty will also meet at the end of the school year after they receive the grant, and once at the return in the fall.
  • This committee will establish a due date for faculty applications for Course Development money. We also need to establish content for the application.
  • Basic details to keep in mind: Anyone on the advisory committee can apply for Course Dev grants. Those who choose to be on the panel that decides which faculty members receive the grants, however, must recuse themselves from evaluating.
  • It’s important for us to note that this effort is about the Humanities—as     technology becomes a major part of everyone’s work/life, technology is increasingly present in Humanities work. In other words, technology is naturally finding its way into Humanist work. We want to make it clear to the community that we are not expecting major technological integration into their Humanist work in order for the work to be considered DH. Simply learning to use a contemporary tool in the classroom is on point, although more advanced requests are also encouraged.
  • During the Spring Symposium meeting we established four major themes to guide our DH efforts. They should be written into the application process. 1. Pedagogy 2. DH: What is it? 3. The Humanities: Critical questions about humanities and technology. 4. Tools
  • If faculty are interested in having a computer program or application built, they are encouraged to turn to the Digital Research Studio for this kind of project. Digital Course Development money is more generally intended for developing courses in the Humanities which use a new digital tool for teaching the course, or which think critically about technology, or which integrate technology into the course work.
  • The course will be the intellectual property of the faculty member who designs the course.
  • It is proposed that we will use Sakai for the application process.
  • What will be included on the applications for Course Development Grant Money:

Information: At the top of the application will be a paragraph defining what DH is and what will or will not be applicable as a Digital Course for this grant. Applicants are also encouraged to attend the DH Spring Symposium as useful information about DH, the humanities, pedagogy, and tools will be presented there. There will also be a series of panels/workshops in the afternoon at the Spring Symposium. Faculty may only ever receive one grant for Digital Course Development. They cannot receive multiple grants throughout the life of the Mellon Grant. They can, however, participate in other DH funded events such as the Summer Faculty Workshop or the Digital Technology Studio.

 

Deadlines:

March 6, 2015

September 18, 2015

February 5, 2016

 

Application Content:

    • 1. Describe your proposed course. Is it a new course or a redesign of an existing course.
    • 2. What are the overarching questions or themes of the course?
    • 3. How does this course add to the Humanities curriculum and/or your departmental program offerings?
    • 4. What digital tools will you use?
    • 5. If you receive the grant, how will it affect your pedagogy?
    • 6. Is there anything you would like to add?
    • 7. What kind of assistance do you need? Are you applying for an undergrad assistant, grad assistant, or other resources such as IT, library assistance, Humanities Collections? What is the assistant’s role?
    • 8. When do you first plan to teach this course? (Faculty do not have to teach the course right away. They may choose to teach it in the future)

 

  • We will also include a note in the grant application for additional resource requests: If your course relies on small-scale technological resources unavailable to you, a separate application can be made to the digital technologies committee and be purchased for the digital studio.
  • Collaboration between faculty members is encouraged but not required.

DH@CC Spring Symposium Meeting December 19, 2014

Spring Symposium Meeting December 19th from 11am to 12:30pm

Overall major topics discussed:

  • The Spring Symposium will act as an inaugural event—an announcement to the community that the Mellon DH grant has been initiated. Conversation is the focus of the symposium to answer the larger question of what DH is and to educate members of the community about how this might improve their work.
  • We do not need to keep the focus completely on the term DH. The focus can be more open: digital projects, digital methods, digital resources for humanities work. Keeping the conversation open will allow more individuals the space needed to feel comfortable in the space of DH.
  • It is important for us to focus on humanities within this effort, and not just building new digital tools or spending the money on the usual tech-centered activities like mapping and data mining. It is important for us to ask political questions and highlight tool use as there will be an audience for both. There are two focuses, then: Humanities/Humanist work and tools.
  • We will consider a keynote speaker who asks big questions regarding the political, the humanities.
  • We will do an unconference for the all day event: The morning will be a series of speakers, some of whom will demonstrate their digital humanist work. The afternoon will be a break-out session determined through feedback given after the lunch break by those who participated in the morning.
  • The 4 themes of the Spring Symposium: Pedagogy, The Humanities, DH, and tools
  • So that we don’t overwhelm the morning event, there will be an opening speech on DH (Miriam     Posner) in the founder’s room, and then 3 simultaneous panels to follow. These panels will be themed with one of the 4 themes previously mentioned; Pedagogy, The Humanities, Tools.
  • The Spring Symposium will take place over two days: Keynote event on Wednesday, February 18th in the evening at Rose Hills, Pomona Campus (to be confirmed) and Friday, February 20th all day panels in the Honnold Mudd Library. We may be using HM’s Lecture Capture to share the event.
  •  Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015 from 7-10pm: Keynote Lecture at Rose Hills, Pomona
  • Friday, Feb. 20, 2015:
    • Plenary 9 a.m. – DH (field of study)
    • Session 1 – 10 a.m.: Humanities (Bigger than DH; critical thinking; liberal arts)
    • Session 2 – 11 a.m.: Pedagogy
    • Session 3 – 12 noon: Tools
    • LUNCH 1-2 p.m: The library will present “Best Practices”
    • Unconference 2-4 p.m.