claremontdh

Alex Juhasz’s DH Story: An Invitation

In the Summer of 2014, I agreed to helm the Mellon Digital Humanities grant awarded to the Claremont Colleges. I had not authored the grant application (this effort was led by my colleague Jacque Wernimont, now at ASU), so first I read it to ascertain that I could shepherd its several categories of support in good faith. More importantly, I needed to evaluate my own comfort level with becoming a face of DH in/for Claremont, again obviously something I decided to take on, but in this case with a more complex back-story (my DH story below), one I am about to unroll here in hopes that it might prove illuminating for those who are in the earlier stages of developing their own (this prosthelytizing, or at least tutoring about DH being obviously one of my main roles as grant administrator, and of DH itself).

I have an open-hearted, big-tent approach to the digital humanities whereby I believe that all humanists are most likely digital, only they don’t know it or don’t want to know it. By this I mean they are probably using digital methods in their teaching, research or publication and/or they are considering the digital, as humanists in their teaching, research or publication, but perhaps they are not fully aware of or interested in the conversations in the newly developing field of DH that applies to said activities.

Given that every humanist is a digital humanist in that they probably email, read and watch things online, use the Internet for their teaching, and/or use digital machines to record, store, write, and publish, what use could such a completely capacious definition serve? As far as the grant is concerned, I’d suggest there are two important outcomes from such openness. And then, as far as my own DH story, I’ll add a few more. Here in Claremont (and across the humanities), a generous DH allows for:

  • new opportunities for inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary connections and collaborations in relation to themes, methods, tools, and outcomes
  • new opportunities for funding, publishing, teaching, and other professional possibilities connected to a growing interest in DH in a time of humanities scarcity
  • new opportunities to learn, refine, and question digital possibilities within our worklife as humanists, and as citizens of academia and the world

My own DH story suggests that such opportunities are stimulating and generative. I came to DH a doubter; or better said, it came to me. In a 2009 blog post entitled, “Digital Humanities,” I wrote:

Tara McPherson asked of us our relation to the term “digital humanities,” and I said I had always thought of myself as a media scholar, artist, and activist but would be pleased to also take on this newer title. However, after spending a few days amongst digital humanists of various home disciplinary stripes, I believe that this inter-disciplinary field holds much in common with earlier practices enabled through the work of scholars who have pressed at the intersections of academia and art and/or activism.

Shortly thereafter, and with McPherson’s help and that of the Vector‘s team at USC (and more Mellon and also NEH funding), I built and then published my born-digital, free, online “video-bookLearning from YouTube (MIT Press, 2010). That publication led to many more “DH” possibilities. I was invited to write, present, interact, and challenge the digital themes and methods raised by that project in that it critically considered and also used digital platforms and tools for teaching, writing, research, and publication. While my more longstanding homes in Media Studies, feminist and queer studies, and activist academia certainly embraced this new project, I found that invigorating conversations about critical or activist Internet studies were as often as not happening around the edges of DH. In fact, I’d suggest that librarians and people in Rhetoric have been at this for much longer than most of us other humanists and I really enjoyed the conversations I was having as a “DH” person with many people who I was meeting in these fields through DH.

Since then, I’ve engaged in any number of projects I’ll gladly call DH (and other things)—if it will have me—that further situate my teaching, research, and writing at what I hope are the most critical edges of the Internet (often tipping off, I must admit):

  • I taught Learning from YouTube for the fourth time this Spring, and I had hoped to add a practicum where some of my Claremont students would have taken the class with ten inmates at Norco California Rehabilitation Center as part of the larger Prison Education Project (hence the tipping off I spoke of above), thereby challenging our understandings of the power, relevance, and reach of YouTube (and the Internet more broadly) given that some of the students in the class would have been denied access to the web as an integral feature of  of their punishment. While this was cancelled by the Prison at the last minute, I ended up writing about the relations between social (in)justice and social media twice at a site called Lady Justice. And the class allowed me to refine my on-going thinking about new and social media and feminism.
  • FemTechNet, which I co-facilitated with Anne Balsamo during its inception in 2012, is an international collective of artists, activists, academics, librarians, technologists and students that has conceived and successfully run the DOCC (Distributed Open Collaborative Course), a feminist rethinking of the MOOC (Massive Open Online Class). I have taught the DOCC twice to Claremont students.
  • My current research project is Ev-Ent-Anglement: an experiment in a digital embodied collective feminist media praxis committed to intentionaly recutting the fragments of ourselves otherwise strewn willy-nilly across the Internet.
  • I have taught Visual Research Methods every year at Claremont Graduate University since 2011, where graduate students across several humanities disciplines learn how to “provide a theoretical and historical background for considering three scholarly traditions—from the arts, humanities, and social sciences—that research about and/or with visualization tools (cameras; digital media) and/or visual objects (art, photography, film, video, digital media).” See this blog post where students in the second iteration of the course define DH. That year I added the really useful (and available online for free) anthology Debates in the Digital Humanities (Matthew Gold, ed.). I highly advise it for doubters or newcomers.
  • My class, linked site, and public performance, Feminist Online Spaces, attempts to “build and link principled sites in collaboration.” It builds from my criticism of YouTube (a corporate enterainment platform that we’ve been given for free) to imagine, interrogate, and inhabit other kinds of Internet spaces and communities, especially those built outside the dominant logics of corporate capitalism.
  • And of course, I blog here and elsewhere, and have since 2007: an integral part of my digital life, and one I require of my grad students in VRM (to build and write an “academic blog” among other digital things).

Over the next four years of the DH@CC grant I look forward to hearing the DH Stories of many of you here in Claremont, and those we will meet elsewhere. And I use this blog post as an invitation to hear your Claremont DH stories.

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Respond to Urgent Mapping Requests

Claremont Colleges Missing Maps Mapathon


Join us Saturday February @10am for a fun event to contribute to urgent mapping requests. The Missing Maps project is an open collaboration of NGOs that aims to map the most vulnerable places in the developing world, so that international and local organizations, as well as individuals can use the maps and data to better respond to crises affecting the areas. We’ll support the Community Mapping and Training project with the national Department of Disaster Management Affairs in Malawi.  This job aims at adding the missing buildings, that will serve to estimate the number of affected people for each settlement.

For more information and to sign up you can visit http://missingmaps.strikingly.com. No experience is needed.  Bring a laptop (preferably along with a mouse). No software installs are required.  This session is located at the CGU Academic Computing Building (ACB) Room 214

DH@CC 2015 Spring Symposium Presentations

DH@CC Spring Symposium Presentations

DH@CC is proud to present the following 5C speakers at the 2015 Inaugural Spring Symposium, which will be held on February 20th at the Honnold Mudd Library. Times and locations will be posted in the coming weeks.

HUMANITIES  School Field
Warren Liu SCR English
Carina Johnson PIT History/Religion
Richard McKirahan POM Classics
Laura Trombley via video PIT English
Kevin Mulroy CCL American Studies
Mark Andrejevic POM Media Studies
Jeff Groves HMC Literature
PEDAGOGY School Field
Max Benavidez CMC New Media, Communications and Higher Education
Ashley Sanders CCL Digital Scholarship
Nancy Macko SCR Art
Alex Juhasz PIT Media Studies
Vida Mia Garcia and Tom Maiorana POM/Red Cover Studios Ethnographer and Designer
Jonathan Hall POM Media Studies
Cynthia Humes CMC Religion/IT
TOOLS School Field
Eric Doehne SCR Art Conservation
AJ Strout CC Video
Warren Roberts CCL GIS
David Bachman PIT Math
Rachel Mayeri HMC MS
Dan Michon CMC Religion
Rachel Levy HMC Mathematics

DH@CC Spring Symposium Meeting January 26, 2015

Spring Symposium Meeting, January 26, 2015

  • The Spring Symposium sub-committee is meeting to determine the workshop speakers, their topics, and a working schedule for presentations at the February 20th Spring Symposium event in the library. Since many faculty members were not available for this meeting, we will hold nominations for the workshops today and send out invitations to these nominees tomorrow.

 

  • PR materials have been developed for the grant and for the Spring Symposium. The www.claremontdh.com website now features the DH@CC logo that Joel Cinnamon of CUC has designed for us. It has already been implemented on the posters designed by Kate Crocker. In the coming weeks, branded USB flash drives will be made available for further promotion of the event.

 

  • The Spring Symposium has been announced on the official DH@CC blog/website, and several of the 5Cs have agreed to announce it on their events pages and/or academic calendars. News of our guest speakers (Dr. Alan Liu on Feb 18 at Rose Hills, and Dr. Miriam Posner on Feb 20 at Honnold Mudd 9am) is spreading quickly and efficiently.

 

  • Alex envisions that the “Workshop Presentations” will be 5 minute, information presentations which highlight the use of a tool, method, or larger question for research, writing, or teaching in the Digital Humanities. We will encourage the presenters to raise questions which might facilitate discussion during the afternoon’s unconference.

 

  • Once we have a working list of faculty who will present, along with titles and abstracts for their presentations, we will upload this information to the claremontdh.com website.

 

  • Again, there are 4 themes/rubrics for the Spring Symposium. 1. DH – definitions and critical thinking. This will be presented in the morning by Dr. Miriam Posner. The other three themes/rubrics will be presented by our faculty nominees: 2. Pedagogy 3. Humanities 4. Tools.

 

  • Ashley Sanders will manage the schedule for Feb 20th’s Spring Symposium’s Workshop event. AJ will provide details as they manifest, and meet with Ashley to further discuss publishing on the DH@CC website. The finalized schedule with faculty names, titles/abstracts for presentations, and times will be provided by Ashley and AJ to Kate Crocker, who will develop a brochure and event schedule for distribution.

 

  • There is now a link at the top of the DH@CC Home Page which attendees for the Spring Symposium may use to RSVP for lunch, and provide ideas/questions that they would like to discuss during the unconference on the afternoon of Feb 20th. The link is easy to access and use.

DH@CC Digital Course Development Meeting January 26, 2015

Digital Course Development Meeting January 26, 2015

DH@CC Digital Course Development Application: http://claremontdh.com/applications/

 

  • This sub-committee is meeting to design the application for Digital Course Development funding. It is our intention to make the application available tonight. We will work from the draft we began on our December 19th meeting.

 

  • For the sake of time and accessibility, the document is being produced through Google Sheets. In the future, we may explore alternative options.

 

  • To raise awareness of the application, it will be announced at upcoming faculty/curriculum meetings, distributed to the DH@CC Advisory Committee and to the Deans of Faculty, uploaded to the blog, announced at the DH@CC Spring Symposium Keynote event as well as the larger event at the library.

 

  • The Spring Symposium committee has decided to invest in branded USB flash drives for PR. Along with information regarding DH@CC events and opportunities, a link to the application will also be made available therein.

 

  • The details are, again, for Digital Course Development funding: Faculty will receive $6,000 for development of their digital course, and up to an additional $4500 in the summer or when they teach the course for undergrad, or $5,500 for a graduate assistant. The grant has been specifically written for course development only at the 5Cs.

 

  • Deadline for faculty applications for Digital Course Development is March 6, 2015. The review process will take place by the Digital Course Development sub-committee on March 9, 2015. Applicants will be notified that week, by March 13, 2015.

 

  • Ashley Sanders has provided an excellent working definition for the Digital Humanities. “DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools…”

 

Below is the 2nd draft of the Digital Course Development Application:

 

DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools to

  • visualize and analyze data
  • share and annotate primary sources
  • discuss and publish findings
  • collaborate on research and teaching for scholars, students, and the general public.

(Ashley Sanders, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Claremont Colleges, “Defining the Digital Humanities,” Colonialism Through The Veil [blog], 2013)

 

Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges takes an expansive and inclusive approach: scholars who use digital methods in their teaching, research or publication and/or are considering the digital, as humanists, in their teaching, research or publication. Faculty with appointments in fields not traditionally understood as the Humanities are welcome to apply if they are engaging in Humanistic inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to attend the DH@CC Spring Symposium (February 18 and 20, 2015). Faculty can receive one grant for Digital Course Development, must teach the course they received funding for twice within the grant period, and give an informal presentation on their course as part of the grant’s community programming. that will be recorded and posted in Scholarship@Claremont . Faculty can apply for other DH grants: the Summer Faculty Workshop and/or the Digital Technology Studio.

 

Deadlines:     March 6, 2015

September 18, 2015

February 5, 2016

 

Application Content:

Name:

College:

Department:

Will the course be cross-listed?

Is it a new course or a redesign of an existing course?

When do you first plan to teach this course? (Faculty do not have to teach the course right away. They may choose to teach it in the future)

 

  1. Describe your proposed course. What are the overarching questions or themes of the course? 250 words max
  2. How does this course add to the Humanities curriculum and/or your departmental program offerings? 250 words max
  3. What do you hope to accomplish if you add or implement technology within this course? 250 words max
  4. Does your course require digital tools? What kind of assistance/technology do you need? Such as: IT support, library assistance, digitizing primary sources/special collections? 100 words max
  5. If you are applying for an assistant, are you requesting funding for an undergraduate ($4,500) for summer or or graduate student ($5,500) for research or for assistance when the course is taught? Do you already have someone in mind? What is their role?
  6. Additional Information (optional)

 

  • We will also include a note in the grant application for additional resource requests: If your course relies on small-scale technological resources unavailable to you, a separate application     can be made to the digital technologies committee and be purchased for the digital studio.

 

  • Collaboration between faculty members is encouraged but not required.

DH@CC Summer Institute Meeting January 26, 2015

Summer Institute Meeting January 26, 2015

Summer Institute application form: http://claremontdh.com/applications/

 

  • This sub-committee is meeting today to design a grant application for the Summer Institute and determine its shape and goals. As no faculty members were able to attend today, we will address the details for the application alone, and plan for another meeting in which we can determine the goals and details of the Institute itself.

 

  • PR materials have been developed both for the grant, and specifically for the Spring Symposium. The claremontdh.com website now features the DH@CC logo that Joel Cinnamon of CUC has designed for us. This logo can be used on all pertinent DH materials at the 5Cs. It has already been implemented on the posters designed by Kate Crocker from the Library. This is also viewable on the www.claremontdh.com website.

 

  • Faculty who wish to apply for the Summer Institute or Course Development Grants will be strongly encouraged to attend the Spring Symposium, our inaugural event which is meant to facilitate discussion regarding current projects and ongoing questions at the Claremont Colleges and ideally to introduce DH to faculty who are unfamiliar with it.

 

  • Likewise, faculty who wish to apply for Digital Course Development funding will be strongly encouraged to attend both the Spring Symposium, and the Summer Institute.

 

  • Once details are determined for the Summer Institute, this information will become available on the claremontdh.com website. We have decided to add a rotation of tabs for each event that we facilitate for the DH grant at the 5Cs. Later this week, for example, there will be a Spring Symposium tab. Once the event is over, this will become the Summer Institute tab.

 

  • Ashley Sanders has provided an excellent working definition for the Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges. “DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools…”

 

  • There is concern amongst those present at this meeting, that the questions on our application will seem daunting or overwhelming. By keeping the required responses at a maximum of 250 words, we hope to quell any concern. The information collected on the application has been polished into a succinct but necessary group of questions which will assist in the selection process.

Below is a rough draft of the application for the Summer Institute:

 

June 1-5, 2015

The DH@CC Summer Institute is a five-day opportunity for ten faculty members to be introduced to the themes, tools, and pedagogical principles and practices of the Digital Humanities. There is a $1,000 stipend for attending. We will give preference to those who are new to the field. The institute is a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion about underlying frameworks for DH, as well as hands-on learning and demonstrations in tools and methods. There will be opportunities for 1-1 mentoring and interaction with outside and local specialists. After attending the institute, you will be prepared to apply for the course development grant or launch the first stages of a digital humanities grant and/or project. Applications are due March 6, 2015.

DH is the study, exploration, and preservation of, as well as education about human cultures, events, languages, people, and material production in the past and present in a digital environment through the creation and use of dynamic tools to

– visualize and analyze data

– share and annotate primary sources

– discuss and publish findings

– collaborate on research and teaching for scholars, students, and the general public.

(Ashley Sanders, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Claremont Colleges, “Defining the Digital Humanities,” Colonialism Through The Veil [blog], 2013)

 

Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges takes an expansive and inclusive approach: scholars who use digital methods in their teaching, research or publication and/or are considering the digital, as humanists, in their teaching, research or publication. Faculty with appointments in fields not traditionally understood as the Humanities are welcome to apply if they are engaging in Humanistic inquiry. Applicants are encouraged to attend the DH@CC Spring Symposium (February 18 and 20, 2015). Faculty can attend the Summer Institute once, and are encouraged to apply for a Digital Humanities Course Development grant and/or the Digital Technology Studio.

form:

  1. What do you already know about DH or digital learning? (250 words max)
  2. What do you hope to learn? (250 words max)
  3. What do you want to work on during the institute? (250 words max)
  4. Additional information (optional)

Dr. Alan Liu and Dr. Miriam Posner Featured at the DH@CC Spring Symposium

Dr. Alan Liu

AlanLiu

On February 18, 2015, 7 pm, Rose Hill Theater, Pomona College, Dr. Alan Liu (Professor of English, UCSB) will present the opening address for the CC@DH Spring Symposium, “Key Trends in the Digital Humanities: How Digital Humanities Challenge the Idea of the Humanities.” He will consider, “how such key methods in the digital humanities as data mining, mapping, visualization, social network analysis, and topic modeling make an essential difference in the idea of the humanities, and vice versa?” Using examples of digital humanities research, Dr. Liu will speculate on the large questions that confront the humanities in the face of computational media–most importantly, questions about the nature and function of interpretive “meaning.”

Refreshments will be served. For more information about Dr. Liu’s work in the Digital Humanities, read his article titled, “Where is Cultural Criticism in the Humanities.” You can also read his profile at UCSB.

Dr. Miriam Posner

Miriam

On February 20th, 2015, Dr. Miriam Posner will open the CC@DH day-long Symposium with a presentation, “Framing the Digital Humanities,” defining the Digital Humanities by its uses, tools, and methods. “Digital humanities gets a lot of buzz, but what is it, fundamentally? What can you do with digital humanities tools and methods, and how might it be useful in a liberal arts context? We’ll look at some example projects and talk about where DH might be heading in coming years.”

Dr. Posner’s presentation will be held at 9am in the Honnold Mudd Library. A series of informal workshops and presentations on the Digital Humanities at the Claremont Colleges, addressing the Humanities, Pedagogy, and Tools, will follow.

For additional information about Dr. Miriam Posner’s work in DH, you can visit her blog or check out her bio.